Monthly Archives: April 2014

TGP 22 The ProGen Study Group with Angela McGhie

Featured Guest

Angela Packer McGhie – A Discussion of the ProGen Study Group

The ProGen Study Group with Angela Packer McGhie on the Genealogy Professional podcastThis week instead of speaking with an individual genealogy professional we are focusing on the ProGen Study Group in order to provide our listeners with more information about the program.

Here is a brief description of the program taken from the ProGen website. For further information have a listen to the interview and then visit the ProGen website.

“The ProGen Study Groups are organized to encourage professional and aspiring genealogists to put into practice the principles found in Professional Genealogy: A Manual for Researchers, Writers, Editors, Lecturers and Librarians, edited by Elizabeth Shown Mills. This program employs an innovative method of collaborative learning focused on developing genealogical research skills and business practices.

Each month group members study one or two chapters of Professional Genealogy and complete a practical assignment relating to the material. They meet online to discuss the ProGen Book by Elizabeth Shown Millstopic in small group discussions. Members review each other’s assignments and offer constructive feedback. The study program covers all of the chapters in the book, including research procedures and business practices. This program requires a huge time commitment, but provides a unique opportunity for constructive feedback from colleagues.

Each ProGen study group has a BCG Certified Genealogist mentoring the group. These volunteer mentors participate in the monthly discussions to answer questions and offer guidance.”

Contact Links

The ProGen Study Group website

The Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh (GRIPitt)

The Boston University Genealogy Certificate program

The National Genealogical Society (NGS) Home Study Course in American Genealogy

ACTION:

This week we focus on education and follow the ProgGen theme we’ve already started. In this exercise we will visit the readiness questionnaire on the Waiting List page of the ProGen website.

Fill out the questionnaire to get a sense of where you are in your educational journey.

**** IMPORTANT – DO NOT press the Submit Application button unless you truly want to be added to the ProGen wait list.

Are you ready for ProGen? Do you need to participate in some other educational opportunities first? This questionnaire will give you a sense of where you are now on your journey. If you’re not quite ready for ProGen then consider the NGS Home Study Course or the BU Certificate program (links above). Angela also suggested reading Val Greenwood’s The Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy.

Direct Link to this post:

http://www.TheGenealogyProfessional.com/progen-angela-mcghie

TGP 21 Jane Wilcox – New York Research

Featured Guest

Jane E. Wilcox

Jane E. Wilcox is a genealogical researcher, writer, editor, lecturer, and radio show host, with more than forty years of genealogy experience. She owns Forget-Me-Not Ancestry in Kingston, N.Y. and is a member of the Association of Professional Genealogists (APG) and the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society (NYG&B) Education Committee.
Jane hosts The Forget-Me-Not Hour: Your Ancestors Want Their Stories to Be Told radio show on the internet at www.BlogTalkRadio.com/JaneEWilcox (and formerly on WHVW 950 Jane E. Wilcox on the Genealogy Professional podcastAM radio in Poughkeepsie, N.Y.) and is author of the forthcoming family biography, From England to America: The Odyssey of the William and Margaret Wilcockson Family. She has consulted for the producers of the hit TV show CSI: Crime Scene Investigation for a genealogy mystery TV pilot.

Jane holds an M.S. degree in journalism from Northwestern University, a B.A. degree in English literature and in history, with an emphasis in Colonial American history, from the University of Michigan, and a Teacher’s Certification from the University of Wisconsin-Parkside. As a historian, journalist and teacher, Jane brings historical context to all of her work and enjoys sharing her knowledge with her clients and audiences.

Fascinated with genealogy and history since she was a child, Jane learned genealogy on the lap of her grandmother, a national genealogical records chairman for the Daughters of the American Revolution. Through her research, she has come to believe that the ancestors want their stories to be told.

Contact Links

Website for Jane Wilcox

Jane Wilcox on Facebook

Jane Wilcox on Twitter – @janeewilcox

Other Links

Association of Professional Genealogists

One Action Genealogists Can Take Right Now

“Join the Association of Professional Genealogists and take advantage of what they have to offer.”

Recommended Book

Secrets of the Millionaire Mind by T. Harv Eker

Productivity Tool

Using tables in MS Word for client reports

Advice

“Don’t try to be like everyone else. Find your unique niche and use your unique skills and let people know what you have to offer. “

Action Item

This week we switch from talking about to-do lists to focusing on discipline.  Discipline is forcing yourself to do something you don’t want to do but will be beneficial for you to do. It doesn’t necessarily have to do with your job at all unless of course you need to start working fewer hours. But the overall benefit should improve your day and every aspect of your life. I gave the examples of committing to exercising and making the beds before starting work each morning.

ACTION:

Think of two areas in your life that could use a little more discipline. Figure out how you are going to incorporate these two new commitments into your life.  Keep it simple and try to make it as easy as possible for you to succeed.

Direct Link to this post:

http://www.TheGenealogyProfessional.com/jane-wilcox

TGP 20 Cathi Desmarais – Vermont Research

Featured Guest

Cathi Becker Wiest Desmarais, CG

Cathi is a full-time professional genealogist and owner of Stone House Historical Research, established in 2008. In addition to family history research, Cathi works on U.S. Army military repatriation cases, finding next-of-kin and family DNA donors for unrecovered soldiers from past wars. She also locates missing or unknown heirs and beneficiaries for law firms and title insurance companies. Her work has given her broad U.S. and Cathi Desmarais on the Genealogy Professional podcastinternational experience, with a particular emphasis on Ireland, Vermont, and Pennsylvania.

Cathi currently serves as the Vice-President of the Association of Professional Genealogists and as a board member and mentor program coordinator for the Council for the Advancement of Forensic Genealogy. Cathi’s writing has been published in the National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Crossroads, The NYG&B Record, and the Association of Professional Genealogists Quarterly.

Cathi earned an M.S. Ed. from the University of Vermont, and has attended the Forensic Genealogical Institute in Dallas, Texas; the Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh (GRIP); the Institute of Genealogical and Historical Research at Samford University; the National Institute on Genealogical Research in Washington, DC; and Boston University’s Genealogical Writing course. She has lectured locally as well as at the GRIP and the Forensic Genealogy Institute.

Contact Links

Stone House Historical Research website

Stone House Research on Facbeook

No Stone Unturned blog

Cathi Desmarais on Twitter – @cathidesmarais

Other Links

Council for the Advancement of Forensic Genealogy

Association of Professional Genealogists

One Action Genealogists Can Take Right Now

Write down your goals. Get them down on paper. Where do you want to be a year from now? And then break down your goals into quarterly, monthly and weekly tasks. Stay open to new possibilities.

Recommended Book

“If you want to improve your writing, I would recommend Getting the Words Right by Theodore Cheney. That was on our bibliography in the writing class taught by Tom Jones and John Colletta a couple of summers ago at Boston University, and it had a big impact on my writing.

I also learn about writing by reading other people’s family history books. I loved Only a Few Bones by John Colletta, The Journey Takers by Leslie Huber, Running Away to Home by Jennifer Wilson, and Annie’s Ghosts by Steve Luxenberg. ”

Productivity Tool

Harvest – time tracking tool

Asana   project management platform 

Advice

“Take your business seriously. Prepare yourself well.”

Action Item

This week we are focusing on the practical. We can start our work week off better if we determine ahead of time what we need to accomplish. Sometimes we start out with the best of intentions. Then somehow our week gets away from us. Our focus this week will be on settings goals and creating to-do lists.  While Cathi talked about setting weekly, monthly and even quarterly goals we are going to focus just on weekly goals.

ACTION:

Make a to-do list for the next 7 days. Prioritize your do-to list in order of importance. You can even separate tasks by days if you like. Print out your to-do list and keep it on the desk next to you or pin it to the wall near your computer.

Next, tackle what you fear most. Whatever is on your list that you want to do least – do that first.  Hold off on accepting, or perhaps just scheduling, new tasks or projects until your existing to-do list is complete. Cross of each item as you finish it to get that sense of accomplishment!

 

Direct Link to this post:

http://www.TheGenealogyProfessional.com/cathi-desmarais

TGP 19 Eileen O’Duill – Probate Research

Featured Guest

Eileen Ó Dúill

Eileen Ó Dúill, has been a professional Irish genealogist since 1990, specializing in legal and probate genealogical research. She is currently the only Certified Genealogist in Ireland. She is a member of the Association of Professional Genealogists and served on the board of the as the International Trustee for Britain and Ireland (2007-2012).Eileen O'Duill - Heirs Ireland on The Genealogy Professional podcast

Eileen has lectured at national and international conferences in the US, Ireland, Canada and the U.K. from 1999 to 2014 and co-presented a webinar on Irish genealogical research for Ancestry.com. She was a course tutor and lecturer on the Diploma in Family History (Genealogy) at the Independent College, Dublin and currently teaches on the summer school programme at University College Cork. She has been admitted as an expert witness in the Surrogate Courts in 6 counties of New York.

Eileen was able to turn a lifelong hobby into a business providing a professional genealogical research service. Being an American living in Ireland for 39 years, has enabled her to have a unique perspective on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean and an understanding of her fellow countrymen in their quest for their Irish heritage.

Contact Links

Heirs Ireland website

Other Links

Celtic Connections Conference, Waltham, MA – August 15 & 16, 2014

Back to Our Past, Dublin, Ireland – October 17-19, 2014

University of Cork, Genealogy Summer School program – June 29 – July 6, 2014

The Gathering, Ireland (2013)

One Action Genealogists Can Take Right Now

“1) Get a copy of Professional Genealogy and 2) follow the Transitional Genealogists mailing list.

Recommended Book

Tracing Your Irish Ancestors by John Grenham

Productivity Tool

Drop Box – Tool for sharing large files

Advice

“Practice, Practice, Practice! Learn by doing. Get as much experience as possible.”

Action Item

This week, since Eileen and I talked quite a bit about public speaking, let’s warm up to the idea and get you thinking about incorporating public speaking into your offerings.  You won’t actually try to arrange any public speaking engagements. First we need to make sure you are prepared in advance.

ACTION: Before you can do any public speaking you need to get prepared with a potential talk, some equipment and a target venue. Here are the three steps for this week’s action item:

1) You Need a Talk

Think of a topic or project that you could turn in to a potential talk. If you are brand new to public speaking stick to a beginner topic or a subject that you know inside and out.

2) You Need Equipment

To do public speaking you will need to have a laptop computer (or borrow one) and have the corresponding software. For Windows computers this is typically PowerPoint. Keynote for Mac users. If you don’t have this equipment currently can you plan to get it in the future or can you borrow it for your talks?

3) You Need a Venue

Select a location to target for your first talk. Ideally it will be a local historical society, genealogical society or local library.  Hopefully you have already established some relationships with the folks in these organizations. If not, go back and do your networking first.

 

Direct Link to this post:

http://www.TheGenealogyProfessional.com/eileen-oduill